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More advice from Frameworkers as they reflect on the things they wish they’d known before starting out in their careers.

We love visitors at The Frameworks, and we’re always pleased to welcome people to our London studio (not only so we can show off our amazing view). Recently, we had a visitor who made an impact on all of us. A graduate who has worked hard to get through university and was keen to glean some advice on the reality of breaking into – and sustaining – a career.

Today, we’re celebrating some of the inspirational women in our lives. Women who have inspired us creatively and professionally. At home and at work. Women who have played a part in shaping who we are – and continue to influence how we look at the world. Today is International Women’s Day.

Those who know me will be aware that as well as being Non-Executive Chairman at The Frameworks and Executive Chairman at Kreston Reeves, I am also the Chair of Trustees at Turner Contemporary, the gallery that is at the forefront of art-led regeneration in Margate.

If I asked you to describe your personal narrative, what would you say? What characteristics would you use to describe yourself? Would you draw from your own experiences or try to project other people’s perception of you?

It has taken me nearly two years to find the courage to write this. So please bear with me. Since I wrote my last blog post, I've given birth to a beautiful baby girl (without even popping a paracetamol), taken 12 months' maternity leave to care for her full time, returned to my role as Creative Content Director (on a part-time basis) and watched more episodes of Peppa Pig than I can count. I'm a "working mum", like so many others, juggling and stressing and laughing and crying. Doing my best to be my best – at the office, at home, at the pub, at the play centre. When I'm wiping away tears. When I'm pitching to clients.

Leicester City – not Jamie Vardy or Wes Morgan – won the “fairytale” Premier League title in 2016. And it was the United States that dominated Rio 2016, not Michael Phelps or Simone Biles. Time and time again, sporting success depends on the combined individual efforts of the people that make up the team.

It’s September and the new academic year is upon us. Children are going back to school, teenagers are starting their A-levels and more than a few 18-year-olds are frantically filling out student loan forms, eagerly anticipating the freedom of university.